Text

Hallelujah

Looks like it’s finally done

Photoset
Photo
ectobiolodaddy:

TAKING A BREEEEEEAK FROM STUDYING FOR MY PHYSIO+ANATOMY FINAL LMFAO

ectobiolodaddy:

TAKING A BREEEEEEAK FROM STUDYING FOR MY PHYSIO+ANATOMY FINAL LMFAO

(via madcarnival)

Quote
"Sometimes you have to give up on people. Not because you don’t care, but because they don’t."

— Unknown   (via date)

(Source: jae--lasoul, via lilaira)

Photoset

minuiko:

More Blind!Nico AU uwu

(via holla-me-a-dolla)

Photoset

DMMd ✕ color palette part 1/??? [captions include hex codes]

(via cresii)

Text

the-waythingswere asked: Okay, so I recently began writing a new story (after shamefully abandoning a previous story with over 30k words) and I'm a little stuck on something pretty trivial. There's a scene in which two characters are walking to a nearby location and talking to each other along the way. My issue is that the scene is basically 70-80% dialogue, which I think makes it boring and would have readers skipping lines. Is there any way I can bring the scene to life? Thanks in advance.

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Well first off, make a list of all of the information this scene delivers unto the reader.

For example,

  • The reader learns there is a great war brewing in the east.
  • The reader learns that Jo has budding feelings for John.
  • The reader learns that hunters frequently poach the woods, looking for…

Then ask yourself if all of this information really needs to be conveyed via dialogue. I’m gonna stick with those things for my scene to use as an example. It’s not gonna be the best writing in the world, but the purpose is just to show you how to work with scenes where there is due to be more dialogue than there has been previously.

Keep Them Talking

The first point about the war could be relayed through conversation alone since there isn’t likely to be a news broadcast in the middle of nowhere. In this instance, word of mouth is the most likely source for the information, so you don’t have to avoid dialogue at all costs. By all means, use it!

'Things are tense now,' said John.

He had his back to me, his gaze trained on the sun as it rose behind the distant mountains.

'They've closed their borders for fear of invasion from the north. There's no way we're getting through that passage today.'

Just don’t make it black and white. Tease information, so that the reader can draw their own conclusions. I don’t have to say, ‘there is a war brewing in the east’. John looking eastward and speaking of closed borders and invasion makes that clear enough.

Undertones

The feelings of one character towards another are things you can layer underneath the scene. Rather than getting a character to shout, ‘I hate you!’ or ‘I care about you!’, try and show their brewing hatred - or affection - in other ways.

He looked thin and frail, and the wound at his arm still seeped through the precarious bandage I’d tied the night before. Pulling my jacket tighter around my waist, I hid the torn part of my shirt out of sight.

'We should keep going,' I said. 'There's a town not far from here -'

'And what if we're seen?'

'You can't carry that injury for much longer. It's already infected.'

'Then I'll lose my arm.'

'Don't be ridiculous.'

I shoved him hard, knocking him a step off balance. It would have been more fitting for me to keep the distance between us, but I closed it with a sure stride. I teased the bandage at his arm and re-tightened the knot…

Rely on Your Setting

You say your characters are walking from A to B, so what kind of things around them can speak on their behalf? I listed that in my scene, there are hunters around, poaching the woods for something specific. It’s not likely that John or Jo would know everything about the landscape or what is to come, so they can see it or hear it instead, right?

Already, I have a fair bit of dialogue in my scene, but it can be broken up with description or internal monologue to keep it from coming across as a ping-pong dialogue segment.

Where the track had once been uncertain, a pathway of flattened grass opened up beneath the tree boughs. John shielded his eyes from the jabbing rays of the sun. If I hadn’t kept my gaze low, I might never have caught it. With no time to explain, I wrapped my arms around his waist and dragged him a few steps back.

'Idiot,' I seethed. 'You almost lost your foot as well as your arm!'

He broke free of my hold and stared ahead, aware of the toothed, metal trap concealed well by the long grass.

'Hunters?' he wondered aloud. 'It's unusual for them to be this far out.'

I shivered. ‘Let’s just get out of here already.’

'Yeah,' he agreed. 'Rumour says they're raised in darkness. They see in the night better than they see during the day.'

I caught a laugh in my throat, then stifled it. Hurt softened his expression for a brief moment, before he continued to walk on ahead. I trotted to keep up…

My examples aren’t the best, but I hope you can see now that dialogue segments can still be kept interesting (this being the operative word when it comes to my quick writing, but you know what I mean, ha ha!) without it all being supported by talking alone.

To recap:

  • Use the five senses. Sometimes taste is a difficult one to put in there, but make sure your characters are taking in the world around them as they walk through it. Give your reader a strong setting, so that they can visualise the world you have created and also learn through the dialogue and the things your characters perceive.
  • Break up the dialogue. Without indicators or any kind of movement between characters, your reader might struggle to keep up with who is talking and when. This in itself should keep the scene from being too dialogue-heavy.
  • Subtext. Try not to have the dialogue too black and white. Make your reader work for their information, and also use the opportunity to show them some character development and character interactions. This will keep the dialogue pieces interesting and also motivate your reader to pay attention as they learn new things about the characters and their feelings for one another.

I hope this helps you out…! Best of luck.

- enlee

Text

sekahyyh:

cardsofclow:

decencybedamned:

HELLO FANFIC AUTHORS IT’S TIME FOR A VOCAB LESSON

  • wantonsexually immodest or promiscuous
  • wontona type of dumpling commonly found in Chinese cuisines

YOUR CHARACTERS SHOULD NOT BE MOANING LIKE A CHINESE DUMPLING OKAY THANK YOU AND GOOD NIGHT

either way, things are sure gonna get

steamy

GET OUT

(via dcassom)

Photo
shell-tear-your-world-apart:

endsofadream:

SOMEONE DO A DATE LIKE THIS WITH ME. I’LL EVEN LET YOU TOUCH THE BOOTY.

Now that’s how you get laid boys.

shell-tear-your-world-apart:

endsofadream:

SOMEONE DO A DATE LIKE THIS WITH ME. I’LL EVEN LET YOU TOUCH THE BOOTY.

Now that’s how you get laid boys.

(via xing2lee)

Photo
fruitegg:

the premise of this horseshit is that like (stay wit me) dirk and roxy, who didnt grow up in the company of other humans and therefore probably have weak immune systems, meet up with jane + jake only to fall ill and roxy parties thru the pain and wears a face mask around them @ first and dirk sulks in bed for a week

fruitegg:

the premise of this horseshit is that like (stay wit me) dirk and roxy, who didnt grow up in the company of other humans and therefore probably have weak immune systems, meet up with jane + jake only to fall ill and roxy parties thru the pain and wears a face mask around them @ first and dirk sulks in bed for a week

(via beta-strider)

Photoset
Tags: waffles food T^T
Text

Anonymous asked: Hi! I'm thinking of role playing. Is there anything I should know about before starting? And If I were to start rping where would I start?

lazyresources:

Since I haven’t roleplayed anywhere else, I’m only going to focus on roleplaying on tumblr.

Generally, there are three way to roleplay here: group roleplay, independent (indie) roleplay, and 1x1 roleplay. Each one of these have their own pros and cons, and it’s really up to you which one will suit you best.

1. Roleplay Groups

Pros

  • Other people in the group will follow you
  • You get to roleplay with everyone in the group 
  • Being part of a roleplay group gives off a sense of community

Cons

  • There are rules on how you should roleplay, which will cover aspects like the length of your writing, the content of your roleplay threads, and the time you commit to roleplaying
  • Sometimes you won’t get along with some of the group members

Misc and Links

2. Independent Roleplaying

Pros

  • You get to establish your own rules
  • You have the freedom to choose on how to roleplay and how often you go online

Cons

  • Due to the large amount of indie roleplayers, it can be hard to find a good roleplay partner for you
  • Also because of the number of indie roleplayers, it’s hard to get yourself out there and be noticed; dedication and patience is needed

Links

3. 1x1 Roleplaying

Pros

  • You get to establish your own rules
  • Since it’s one-on-one, there’s a tendency to have a deeper discussion about plots and characters
  • The replies in 1x1 roleplays tend to be longer in length

Cons

  • With the large amount of 1x1 roleplayers, it can be hard to find a good roleplay partner for you
  • Also because of the number of 1x1 roleplayers, it’s hard to get yourself out there and be noticed; dedication and patience is needed
  • The replies in 1x1 roleplays tend to be longer in length

Links

Other Things:

On an even more general level, there are several things to know before roleplaying. It’s best to know the terms frequently used in the roleplaying world (I added links below to help you out).

On tumblr, people roleplay either by script or para. Script-style consists mainly of dialogue with added action indicators (e.g. -laughs- Nah. I didn’t steal the cookie from the cookie jar); action indicators can be enclosed between dashes, brackets, slashes, or whatever your prefer as long as you’re consistent. Para-style is what you typically see in books (e.g. She laughed. “Nah. I didn’t steal the cookie from the cookie jar”). Unless you’re part of a roleplay group, the length is really up to you, but please make an effort to reply with more than a sentence when your partner writes a 500+ response. Gifs are another component you can add in roleplaying, though you will see that gifs are mostly seen in script-style threads.

Presentation and organization are important. If your font is too small or is difficult to see read due to font color; your theme is hard to navigate; and links takes a while to find, it will discourage potential roleplay partners from contacting you. It’ll also be nice to have an about page for you and your character. For your about page, add information like activity level, your preferred roleplaying style and length, and topics you would like to avoid seeing. For your character’s about page, write a short biography or anything you feel that is important to know—this will help differentiate you from other roleplay blogs. Apart from that, tag your posts and have a page to keep these tags organized. Have a separate tag for threads, headcanons, interests, and ooc (out of character) things. Look here for an example—the top links are, in order, about the roleplayer, about the character, misc information, list of threads, link to answered asks, and link to open plot ideas. You want to attract someone’s attention, and a great way to do this is by presentation and organization.

One of the biggest pet peeves in the roleplaying world is godmodding. Don’t godmod. Godmodding can mean two things: when your character is ridiculously powerful and when you start controlling your partner’s character. I’m going to elaborate more on the latter. When roleplaying, you only get to decide your character’s actions, reactions, and thoughts. Thus, you cannot write anything about your partner’s character unless your character is assuming or hoping for something. An example is when Character A (yours) punches Character B (your partner’s). You cannot write “Character A punched Character B’s chin” because you’re taking away your partner’s decision on whether or not the attack will land. However, you can write “Character A aimed a blow for Character B’s chin” because nothing is certain, leaving your partner to decide on what Character B will do. Another thing: just because you, the writer, know something about your partner’s character doesn’t mean your character knows that information. 

Know that roleplaying is a hobby. If you’re really active, good. If you’re not very active, good. If something or someone makes your uncomfortable, politely excuse yourself by ending the thread or unfollowing someone. If you need a break, take one. 

I can go on, but there’s already a lot of guides on roleplaying that I’d just end up repeating what they said. 

Getting Started: 

Blogs With Roleplay Tips:

Searching for Partners (goes beyond tumblr roleplaying):

Themes: 

I hope that helps! Roleplaying is a fun hobby—it’ll help you with writing and characterization. And, hey, if you decide to make a roleplay blog, send me the link? I’ll be happy to roleplay with you~

Photo
ineedatowel:

h
mezbee:


D —> You seem to be upset 
D —> Shoosh

Equiusprite’s moirail sensibilities are kicking in. Hug? Pap?? What do???? 

ineedatowel:

h

mezbee:


D —> You seem to be upset 

D —> Shoosh

Equiusprite’s moirail sensibilities are kicking in. Hug? Pap?? What do????

image 

(via strideer)

Photoset

helpyoudraw:

Matte Painting Tutorial

(via vrimska)

Photoset

spencerofspace:

monobeartheater:

I CANT BELIEVE THIS REALLY HAPPENED JESUS FUCKING

I think Karkat just wanted an excuse to try on Daves glasses, then got pissy when Kanaya offered him some instead.

(Source: topazpearl)